“In the country of the wrong, the half-right man might yet turn out to be king”

peter hitchensJournalist and documentary producer Peter Hitchens sees the need for a new approach asboth major parties have been taken over by the same cult, the Clinton-Blair fantasy that globalism, open borders and mass immigration will save the great nations of the West. It hasn’t worked. In the USA it has failed so badly that the infuriated, scorned, impoverished voters of Middle America are on the point of electing a fake-conservative yahoo businessman as President”.

Many will agree with Hitchen’s reflection that – so far – we have been gentler with our complacent elite, perhaps too gentle. He sees the referendum majority for leaving the EU as a deep protest against many things and forecasts:

“If Mr Corbyn wins, our existing party system will begin to totter. The Labour Party must split between old-fashioned radicals like him, and complacent smoothies from the Blair age. And since (Blairite Labour MPs) have far more in common with Mrs May than with Mr Corbyn, there is only one direction they can take. They will have to snuggle up beside her absurdly misnamed Conservative Party.

“And so at last the British public will see clearly revealed the truth they have long avoided – that the two main parties are joined in an alliance against them. And they may grasp that their only response is to form an alliance against the two big parties. Impossible? Look how quickly this happened in Scotland”.

Professor Paul Rogers has also reflected on the shifting of the tectonic plates:

paul rogers“Within the Labour Party, ward after ward is witnessing the impact of new membership but, more importantly, seeing a remarkable degree of anger at what the government has enacted since the election and the palpable lack of opposition by Labour in the midst of its protracted leadership campaign. Many Labour members (Ed: and many not in the party) are angry at:

  • the intended review of NHS funding involving accelerated privatisation,
  • the sell-off of housing-association stock,
  • the constant blaming of the “feckless poor”
  • and the renewed assault on labour rights.

At the same time, inheritance tax is reduced, bank bonuses are rising, tax avoidance is the order of the day, and the Financial Conduct Authority looks set to relax even its modest regulatory grip. Among these and many other indicators of a move to the right, no wonder the Tories’ claimed long-term aim of a “living wage” is treated with deep suspicion.

JC kingHe concludes: “Now, though, the neoliberal transformation under Tony Blair is beginning to come apart at the seams and there appear to be more and more people coming to the conclusion that Corbyn is more about the future than the past. He is actually seen by many, especially younger Labour Party members, as the only candidate of the four that is offering them a challenge to the utter insistence on austerity”.

Rogers draws an analogy with the story of the little boy and the emperor’s new clothes . . . adding: “To put it another way, maybe Jeremy Corbyn hasn’t got it all right but, to adapt HG Wells: ‘in the country of the wrong, the half-right man might yet turn out to be king’ ”

Ed: there have been several pictorial images of such a coronation – the most restrained shown above.

 

 

 

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Posted on August 10, 2016, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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