Category Archives: Event

‘Unpopular’ Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn on stage during a Wirral music festival

Felicity Arbuthnot sent a link to a video showing Jeremy Corbyn – after addressing a rally of 5000 on the seafront in West Kirby in Merseyside – appearing in front of a reported 16-20,000 people at the festival who were waiting for a performance by The Libertines.

Corbyn made ‘a rousing speech’ (Metro) at Tranmere Rovers’ ground Prenton Park, in which he reiterated the policy of making Premier League clubs invest 5% of their income to grassroots football.

The Labour leader asked the Merseyside crowd: “do you want health, do you want housing, do you want care, do you want a society coming together or do you want selective education and fox hunting?” The crowd booed and Corbyn replied: “that’s absolutely the right answer leave the foxes alone.” He said he was “fed up with the nurses, the doctors, the care workers paying the price of austerity – let’s share it out in the future.”

Laura Cullen from the crowd tweeted “actual Jeremy Corbyn has just rocked up on stage. Now that’s how you do politics”.

 

 

mmmmmmmmmmmmm

 

Summarising Tom Colclough’s message: Corbyn and most importantly his vision, must win

Tom Colclough has insisted that despite portrayals of Corbynistas as reckless ideologues, and yes, despite a flurry of bad polls, it is clear to him why Corbyn and most importantly, his vision, must win.

He adds that Labour under Corbyn’s stewardship hasn’t been the catastrophe that many in the parliamentary Labour party wished it to be, no matter how hard they tried to make it so.

Stopping the Tories and their myriad of welfare cuts during this parliament, or forcing the U-turn on a forced academisation programme (Ed: and forensic questioning on PMQs) has been opposition worthy of the name.

Corbyn and to a large part his shadow chancellor John McDonnell have turned the tanker around to face these issues head on. Before Corbyn’s election Harriet Harman was dancing on the pinhead of the welfare bill whilst Chris Leslie was an impotent shadow chancellor.

corbyn-rally

Corbyn successfully reclaimed Labour’s voice and begun reupholstering the party, from top to bottom. Turning a party around in the aftermath of an election that haemorrhaged votes nationwide takes time and support. Labour’s resounding victories in several Parliamentary by-elections and mayoralties since were bitter pills to swallow for Corbyn’s enemies, inside and outside the PLP.

Undeterred, Jeremy Corbyn continued to inspire thousands into becoming Labour members. It is now the largest party in Europe. Of course this is no arbiter of governing ability, but it is a mass resource that tapped into, can help the party reach into corners that others simply cannot.

Now, here is the important bit. Derailing this progress now – which is what removing Corbyn would do – would see the air in the chests of thousands of new members sucked out and their potential contributions curtailed. All that will be left would be a vacuum.

Those who would fill it are those still wanting to walk down the middle of a road that has long since been diverted.

The dynamic of politics as we know it is changing. Labour under Corbyn can make progress, but he needs time, and the support from the PLP that he deserves.

 

 

 

 

Blairite MPs attempt to counter the rising Real Labour membership

Just noted on this site’s stats: on Sunday and Monday alone, nearly 4000 people found our brief post, quoting John Pilger’s view of Jeremy Corbyn – unprecedented for this uncontroversial portal.

Labour membership is said to be on course to hit 600,000, after a second successive day in which more than 100,000 people have applied to become party members, reports Stephen Bush (New Statesman).

Local parties – who are responsible for vetting new members in the first instance – report that the bulk of joiners who have responded to welcome emails or messages from MPs are strongly opposed to any attempt to remove Corbyn, who was elected by 60% of Labour members and supporters nine months ago.

On Friday hundreds gathered in the centre of Birmingham to show support for Jeremy Corbyn.

corbyn hundreds in brum

On Saturday 9th, without warning, Tom Watson announced that a Sunday meeting arranged with trade union leaders, representatives of the PLP and the party leader, at the request of Watson and his colleagues, would not go ahead. McCluskey said, “Extraordinarily, I received no notice of this statement before it was issued. I had made arrangements for specifically for Mr Watson’s convenience”.

Watson’s misrepresentation exposed

McCluskey continued: “I must clarify one point in Tom Watson’s statement – I made it absolutely clear from the outset of these discussions that Jeremy Corbyn’s resignation as the leader was not on the agenda. Watson knew that, and it is entirely wrong to suggest that any public statement by Jeremy represented any change in the situation. This is a deeply disingenuous manoeuvre.

Len McCluskey of Unite and the general secretaries of unions Unison and the GMB pledged their support to Jeremy Corbyn at the Durham Miner’s Gala.

 durham miners' gala

Those Labour MPs who refused to support Jeremy Corbyn in the recent vote of confidence had their invitations to stand on the balcony of the County Hotel and the platform on the racecourse at the Durham Miners’ Gala rescinded.

DMA general secretary Dave Hopper said: “We will not allow those who have sought to humiliate him and undermine the democratic process in the Labour Party the honour of taking part in the aforementioned gala traditions.”

 

 

 

“If ever there was a time for principled leaders, like Jeremy Corbyn, it’s now”

A Daniel come to judgment? Felicity Arbuthnot draws our attention to an article by Tess Finch-Lees, who believes that the Corbyn coup wasn’t staged because Blairites don’t think Jeremy Corbyn could win the next election – it was because they fear he could. She continues:

“A Corbyn win would be an unequivocal endorsement of his progressive Labour and yet another outright rejection of Blair’s right wing New Labour/Thatcherite agenda.

“As chair of the Labour In campaign, Alan Johnson’s line up of pale, male and stale spokespeople failed to inspire.

“Producing the toxic trio though (Blair, Brown and Campbell), was the final nail in the coffin”.

JC rally post referendum

Ten thousand people gathered in Parliament Square last Monday to show Corbyn their support. Amongst them were junior doctors, there to reciprocate the unequivocal support Corbyn showed them during their months of bullying by Jeremy Hunt.

The Blairites determined to oust Corbyn from the outset, even though:

  • he won the leadership with a landslide victory;
  • the membership rejected their right wing austerity agenda, which lost Labour the last election;
  • and rejected the “Tory light” leadership candidates, who failed to vote against proposals to abolish binding child poverty targets, cutting child tax credits, employment allowance and housing benefit for young people. 

Tess ends by saying: “When all Labour’s guns should be pointing at the industrial incompetence of the Tory wreckers, the Blairites are plotting to oust their own leader. Someone whom even they agree is an honourable, decent man. They want to replace him with a Teflon Tony or a PR Dave . . . If ever there was a time for principled leaders, like Jeremy Corbyn, it’s now”. 

 

Read the whole article here:

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/tess-finchlees/jeremy-corbyn_b_10760550.html

 

 

 

Voters enthused by ethical politicians working for the common good in Britain & America

Stop press: as socialist democrat Bernie Sanders wins Wisconsin, building on recent victories in the Western states: Utah, Idaho, Hawaii, Alaska and Washington, winning seven out of eight of the last caucuses and primaries … most of them with ‘overwhelming, landslide numbers’, Sanders looks forward to Wyoming, where he’s hoping to get another victory in the state’s caucuses on Saturday. Like Jeremy Corbyn, according to exit polls, Sanders performed well with his usual strongholds of younger voters.

The guest speaker for the QSS conference on Saturday, March 12th: Clive Lewis, Labour MP for Norwich South.

clive lewisBorn in London in 1971, Lewis was brought up on a council estate in Northampton by a single-parent father.

After studying economics at the University of Bradford, he worked for the BBC and became an officer in the Territorial Army in 2006, serving for three months in Afghanistan.

In 2015 he was elected as MP for Norwich South with a large majority. 

He is currently chair of the Parliamentary Humanist Group and a Shadow Minister for Energy and Climate Change under Lisa Nandy.

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After the Quaker Socialist AGM Clive Lewis was introduced by Chris Newsam, the new QSS Clerk.

Clive Lewis served on the panel of Radio 4’s Any Questions show, held in Thornbury,  Gloucestershire. The audience was ‘conservative Middle-England’ and Lewis described the other panel members as ‘formidable’:

clive aq

MP Jacob Rees-Mogg (above left)  is an anti-EU climate change denier who supported cuts to renewables, Mark Littlewood, Director General of the Institute of Economic Affairs (second left), is also a high-powered anti-EU climate-change denier and Juliet Devonport, CEO of Good Energy is an advocate of renewable energy.

Clive Lewis pointed out that the majority of Conservative ‘green’ cuts were not mentioned in their election manifesto and by implementing them, they’d broken election promises to be greener:

  • Cameron had cut the solar energy and bio-gas subsidies and blocked on-shore wind-farms.
  • He has taxed renewables – and cuts mean that they will miss EU targets by 25% in 2020 and could be fined.
  • Cut-backs have led renewable energy companies in the UK to hold back on further investment.
  • The government has given tax-breaks to the oil and gas industry, thus making the UK the only G7 country to subsidise oil and gas companies.
  • Cameron has kept petrol tax down when oil prices had fallen and
  • has privatised the Green Investment Bank, which destroyed its point.

Lewis was astonished to receive loud applause from such a conservative audience. Indeed, when Jacob Rees-Mogg referred to the threat of “socialist green taxes” the Thornbury audience was silent, and when Rees-Mogg said Cameron’s was “the greatest government ever” he was heckled. 

The lesson he drew from this episode was that even at Thornbury, a Conservative stronghold, ‘natural Tories’ were prepared to oppose Cameron on climate change.

He then answered questions from the audience, advocating the integration of common policies on poverty, equality and climate change. John McDonnell, for example, could incorporate climate change and energy efficiency into his economic policies as part of creating the broad alliance necessary for winning in 2020.

When asked if the scientific evidence for man-made climate change is strong enough to base a broad alliance around it – and if it is really an “existential threat” to humanity, Clive said 97% of scientists thought so and in any case, supporting renewables was worthwhile just on grounds of efficiency, jobs and a clean environment (below).

climate change hoax 2

Clive thought Jeremy was capable of compromise – for example, he was not against civil nuclear power as much as he had been. Jeremy would not shift personally on Trident renewal but the Labour Party as a whole might compromise in September and Jeremy would have to recognise this. Like Jeremy, Clive was against Trident on moral grounds but he recognised that full unilateralism might not be achievable. Compromise was a political necessity.

There are divisions in the Labour Party; the New Labour stalwarts had a “sense of entitlement” and, in order to remove Jeremy, they would be prepared to sacrifice tens of thousands of members. The PLP was still overwhelmingly Blairite in its views. Not only that, but the machinery of the Labour Party – the officials – were also Blairite. The Blairite grip on the party would take a long time to loosen.

Q: Could a Labour foreign policy work without Trident?

Clive thought it could, provided there was an increase in conventional military expenditure. Labour could support a level above 2%, and even take defence spending to 2.5%, in return for non-renewal of Trident. With extra money soldiers could be looked after better and equipment updated.

Drawing on his own experience as an army officer, Clive Lewis said, “MPs would think twice about bombing Syria if they had served in the army”.

Instead of interventions for regime change ( Afghanistan, Iraq or Libya) the armed forces could undertake humanitarian interventions.

children drone killed

They would assist foreign countries, not bomb them: a humanitarian foreign policy. 

He called for an anti-Tory alliance at the 2020 election. The core of such an alliance had to be climate change, though poverty was another area that could unite the left, as was opposition to military intervention for the purpose of regime change.

Clive summed up by pointing out that last May only 1 in 5 voted Conservative so there was hope, if the opposition parties could unite. The problem was more amongst the rank and file than amongst the leaders. Rank-and-file Greens, Labour, SNP and Lib Dems were aggressively against such alliances. Thus Jeremy Corbyn and MP Caroline Lucas were close politically, and were even friends, but their supporters were too tribal to unite.  

He was convinced that climate change was the key to an alliance, or co-operation across parties. It is an existential threat to humanity. In the world war of 1939-45 there was an existential threat to humanity from fascism and “we did not respond with neo-liberalism and privatisation” but with alliances, co-operation and socialism.

Clive Lewis had aroused enthusiasm in a Quaker audience despite calling for a sizeable increase in military expenditure. It was felt that the left of the Labour Party had acquired a major talent. His arguments had been sure-footed and convincing. and his eloquent speech drew extended applause.

Another standing ovation for Jeremy Corbyn

The Mail, The Independent and Sky News websites report that yesterday Jeremy Corbyn was given a standing ovation as he broke with tradition and became the first political leader in living memory to address the National Union of Teachers’ (NUT) conference.

jc 2 nuthttp://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/pa/article-3509138/Corbyn-address-teachers-NUT-spring-conference.html

“George Osborne used the Budget to announce the forced academisation of all schools”.

The Labour leader brought the packed conference hall in Brighton to its feet as he took to the stage to accuse Tories of presiding over a “crisis in our schools”:

“Let’s be clear – this is an ideological attack on teachers and on local and parental accountability – it was nowhere in Tory manifesto, it’s something that’s just been dreamt up at the last minute and stuck into the Budget.I want schools accountable to their parents and their communities – not as a process of asset-stripping our facilities to be handed over to somebody else. There is not a shred of evidence that academies improve standards.”

The FT adds that he argued that ministers’ plans would lead to the “asset-stripping of our education system”.

Nick Gibb, schools minister, came under fire from his own side on Friday as Conservative councillors spoke out against compulsory academisation (FT).

Ben Harris-Quinney, a district councillor in East Hertfordshire, said turning all schools into academies “represents not only one of the largest education reforms in British history, but also one of the largest shifts of power from local to central government”. He said the chancellor and Nicky Morgan, education secretary, needed to explain why such a significant policy move had not been included in the manifesto “and acknowledge that it marks a clear break with the Conservative party’s previous commitment to localism”. It was “not what the British public voted for, and I don’t believe what either local authorities or schools want,” added Mr Quinney, who chairs the Bow Group, a centre right think-tank within the party.

Melinda Tilley, the cabinet member for education at Oxfordshire county council which includes David Cameron’s Witney seat — also weighed in, highlighting the risks to small village schools. They could be in danger if academy chains decided they were no longer viable, she told the Today programme. “I’m fed up with diktats from above saying you will do this and you won’t do that. This is not why I became a Conservative,” Ms Tilley said. “I’m fed up with diktats from above saying you will do this and you won’t do that. This is not why I became a Conservative”.

The Tory priorities are spending money on a reorganisation nobody wants, to reduce the influence and control of local authorities in order to bring in unaccountable academies.

jc nut closeup

Mr Corbyn told the conference his late mother was a maths teacher and NUT member, and drew laughs when he identified someone who he said would benefit from her teachings. He said: “There’s one or two pupils around the country who need extra tuition – one of those is George Osborne. “Having just presented a Budget to Parliament that doesn’t add up – in fact it has a massive black hole in it – I think maybe a little extra tuition would be useful to him. “Is anybody offering? Please, somebody!”

“There is a crisis in our schools now. “Children are facing rising class sizes; there is a shortage of teachers, and parents already face a crisis in school places. Forced academisation will do nothing to address any of those problems . . . Yet, in Osborne’s Budget, over £600 million has been allocated to needless reorganisation that has addressed not a single issue that matters to teachers, parents or pupils. Those are the Tory priorities – they’re absolutely not ours.”

Christine Blower, general secretary of the NUT said that Mr Corbyn asked if he could come and speak to delegates because the approach of the Labour leadership now is to talk to people and have engagement about the policies: “We’ve never actually been approached by anyone else, any politician, who’s wanted to come. So when you get a party leader who’s clearly very interested in doing things differently asking to come, it seemed wise to accede to that”.

Members of the audience shouted: “We love you Jeremy” as he left the stage.

 

 

Preamble to Jeremy Corbyn’s Budget response

Today, Jeremy Corbyn faced what Matthew Norman called “the scariest ordeal in domestic politics, an instant, semi-off-the-cuff response to the Budget” – for all opposition leaders, a nightmare.

JC standingIn his favour: since Corbyn became Labour leader, throughout a period of barely broken turmoil, Norman describes his calm as supernatural: “No sporting analogy properly conveys the leap in class from irrelevant back-bencher to alternative PM; Rocky Balboa’s rise comes close. But Rocky at least had the passionate support of his Philadelphia home town crowd when he fought Apollo Creed”.

Norman refers to the ill wishing ‘supposedly home-town crowd on the Labour benches’, 95% of whom will “fidget on their arses, waiting for the debate to end so they can resume huddling in alcoves and scheming about ousting him”.

Driven by the toddler’s sense of entitlement denied, ‘cabals of New Labour recidivists inside and outside the Commons have been up to their familiar tricks’ three of which he details. Norman’s treatment of the last will amuse some readers – the touting of ‘a ready-made replacement in the square-jawed form of former paratrooper Dan Jarvis’:

dan jarvis“With soldierly courage, Jarvis has overcome his objections to leading Labour. Last summer, he refused to run because his children were too young. My, my, but how quickly they’ve grown. Jarvis, who is hoovering money from previous Labour donors, auditioned for Corbyn’s job on the weekend by repositioning himself a few inches to the left, criticising New Labour’s failure to recognise the pressure on workers’ pay exerted by globalisation. Whether that suggests Jarvis is a trade isolationist, or a fan of restoring lost trade union powers, or both, no one could know. Least of all, you suspect, Jarvis himself”.

Norman points out that almost a year after the election calamity, there is no sign of Corbyn’s detractors developing any coherent alternative philosophy to the neo-Thatcherite Conservatives or to Corbyn himself. 

He sees no tactical opportunity for the detractors: by keeping Corbyn off a leadership ballot “they would unleash a tidal wave of fury that would wash the party away”.

As Andrew Whittaker in the Scotsman says: “Corbyn’s most virulent critics will know that if Jarvis was to move against Corbyn when the party leader remains overwhelmingly popular among the rank and file membership and registered supporters, such a bid would be doomed to failure”.

Norman ends: “If the last election taught us anything, it is that the Labour movement is on the verge of extinction. And if the subsequent Corbyn landslide taught us anything, it is that its long-term survival depends on reigniting and harnessing passions rendered moribund by two decades of anodyne cynics whose paramount concern was assuaging the Daily Mail”.

Extracts from: http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/corbyn-s-post-budget-response-is-doomed-before-he-starts-to-speak-a6932821.html

 

 

#JC4PM tour

Crispin Flintoff is encouraging people to support the first #JC4PM tour event at the O2 Kentish Town on Thursday.

o2 kentish venueDozens of musicians, comedians, poets and people from the political world are coming to show support for Jeremy Corbyn – including Billy Bragg, Charlotte Church, Brian Eno, Ken Loach, Mark Steel, Jeremy Hardy, Francesca Martinez, Grace Petrie, Arthur Smith, Sara Pascoe, Lindsey German, John Rees, Mark Serwotka, John McDonnell and Ken Livingstone.

It will be moving on to Bristol, Edinburgh, Croydon and Newcastle in February and March. More dates are being organised in May. To book tickets go to http://www.jc4pmtour.com/.
concertc crispin flintoffAs yet, only Andrew Whitaker in the Scotsman found the events ‘newsworthy’. Flintoff asks if this is because a story about big names supporting Jeremy Corbyn does not fit in with the narrative that he is losing support or is not credible, and comments, “The range of names backing the Labour leader despite all the media attacks on him undermines the media itself”.

Flintoff (right) continues: “The second reason that the tour is not being reported is that the media want it to fail. If it does not receive publicity then it is harder to sell tickets and fill out the venues. Then they could possibly write a negative story about it!”

Later, in the Independent, he wrote: “The response has taken me by surprise. I have had 7,000 hits in under two days. And since people began discussing it, stories about the tour seem to have begun to appear in newspapers that previously reacted with disinterest” and we note that a day later the Telegraph covered the tour handsomely!

Corbyn’s First Conference: Labour Has Entered a New Chapter

JC conference

A success, according to John Wight in the Huffington Post. He notes:

“After just two weeks in post the newly elected Labour leader, whose election on an unprecedented mandate has been followed by a surge of new members joining the party, immediately found himself faced with a difficult political conundrum. The bulk of support for his leadership, albeit massive, is located outwith the PLP, while the bulk of opposition to it is located within the PLP . . .

“John McDonnell’s conference speech was a game changer. In it the new shadow chancellor planted Labour’s flag firmly on the side of working people and their long neglected needs. In so doing he announced a new and welcome chapter in the history of the party, ending the years in which it has been mired in triangulation and ideology-neutral spin.

“Clamping down on corporate welfare and tax avoidance is not only eminently just, it ends the ignoble kowtowing to big business that has become entrenched in our culture.

“Rebooting the economy from the bottom up on the understanding that a lack of aggregate demand, measured in a crisis of under consumption among working people and the poor, is the only route to sustainable economic growth, is another essential departure from the status quo. When it comes to his intention to embark on borrowing for investment with a view to ending years of economic stagnation due to Tory austerity, this makes impeccable economic sense.

“Borrowing for investment and borrowing for consumption are two entirely different things, which the shadow chancellor outlined.

“A fantastic development is the creation of an economic advisory committee, consisting of some serious intellectual muscle, which will add credibility to Labour’s economic plans. The highlight of McDonnell’s speech came at the end, when he wrapped up with the words, “Another world is possible… solidarity.”

“Hearing those words from a British shadow chancellor was something most of us would never have imagined. What a wonderful antidote to a tradition in which the economy has been viewed as a tyrant of the many in the interests of the few instead of a servant of the many instead of the few. It represents a truly remarkable step-change.

Jeremy’s speech was likewise immense. His core humanity and decency shone through with his reaffirmation of his determination to bring about change in the country’s political culture. Reasoned debate and argument rather than invective and personal abuse is his credo and judging by the response both within the hall and throughout the country, it is being welcomed rather than scorned.

“The part of his speech which confirmed he will be no pushover was the rebuke he delivered to those who blocked the debate on Trident. In reminding conference that he has a mandate for his views on scrapping Trident, and in reaffirming his view that there is no moral or economic case for spending £100billion on renewing weapons of mass destruction, he set down a marker for a future struggle within the party. . .

“There is no moral, ethical, or economic case for nuclear weapons in 2015. On this Jeremy Corbyn is absolutely correct.

“Overall, though, it is a case of so far so good with Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership of Labour. He has been personally immense, dealing with the inordinate pressure, scrutiny, and expectation over these past few months with grace, dignity, and strength. The right wing media’s relentless attempts to undermine and smear him have rebounded.

“While decency in a political leader is clearly something they have trouble with, thankfully the tens of thousands flocking to the party have no problem dealing with it. On the contrary, they represent a country desperate for it”.

Unelectable – moi?

manchester 2  crowd sept 15

September: Manchester overflow