Category Archives: Jeremy Corbyn

Jeremy Corbyn fends a question about the Co-operative Bank

———- Forwarded message ———
From: Richard House
A friend sent me this – Jeremy at his consummate best.
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Labour should allow the Johnsonian chaos to unfold, then have an election date of their own choosing

Dr Richard House reasons with those sceptics and wavering loyalists who are finding Labour’s Brexit strategy confusing or inconsistent. Edited extracts:

Successful politics is about being flexible and responding deftly to rapidly changing conjunctures – without sacrificing core principles.

The refusal to agree to Boris Johnson’s desire for an election avoids walking into an electoral trap and risking years of yet more ruling-class assault, it’s surely a no-brainer!”

Ideological Remainers and ideological Leavers are reminded that a rigid adherence to polarised positions, reconfiguring everything to fit those positions, risks five more years of a Johnsonian nightmare, just to cling on to a purist Lexit narrative that dictates leaving the EU immediately.

Johnson and Cummings are manoeuvring to engineer an immediate election fought on their chosen Brexit ground, rather than on nine years of policy-making calamity. Far better, as Emily Thornberry expediently advises, to “let them stay in power for a few more weeks – then people can see how bad they are”.

Far from being “a formula for inaction and indecision”, this is realpolitick and an attempt to maximise the chances of Labour winning next time.

Let’s allow the Johnsonian chaos to unfold a bit, then have an election date of our own choosing, not at an opportunistic date of theirs which might well bury our yearned-for Corbyn project for good.

 

 

 

 

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Guardian, 31st August: Jeremy Corbyn calls for the people to determine the country’s future

Richard House draws attention to an article by Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the Labour party, which had been shared 1600 times at 15.48 today.

Some points:

Jeremy Corbyn asserts that Boris Johnson’s government wants to use no deal – which would destroy jobs and cause shortages of food and medical supplies from day one and hand our public services and protections over to US corporations – to create an offshore tax haven for the super-rich and sign a sweetheart deal with Donald Trump.

Meeting at the G7 in Biarritz

He reminds us that in 2017, Boris Johnson, when foreign secretary, proclaimed that there was no plan for no deal because they were going to get a deal, continuing: “But clearly they haven’t got a deal. And now, running scared of being held to account for his reckless plans for a Trump-deal Brexit, Johnson has decided to shut down parliament to stop them doing so”.

Adding that, ‘in the maelstrom of the coming days and weeks’, all should remember that sovereignty doesn’t rest in Downing Street, or even in parliament, Jeremy Corbyn states that the democratic way forward, when a government finds itself without a majority, is to let the people determine the country’s future and call a general election which will give them the chance to have the final say in a public vote, with credible options for both sides, including the option to Remain.

He ends by expressing his determination to ensure that Labour will bring people together by giving hope and confidence that a different future is possible and that real change can be delivered for every region of this country.

 

Read the whole article here: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/aug/31/final-sovereignty-on-brexit-must-rest-with-the-people–jeremy-corbyn

 

 

 

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Jeremy Corbyn spineless? Feedback welcomed!

A Moseley resident draws attention to an article by Peter Oborne (left), recalling that Jeremy Corbyn’s policies struck a chord with some voters as he cut the Tories’ Commons majority in the 2017 General Election. These included the intention to impose tougher wealth taxes, to renationalise great swathes of the country’s public utilities, to cancel our Trident nuclear defence system and to introduce rent controls.

He added: “Above all, they saw a man who stuck to his principles, unlike David Cameron and Tony Blair who they regarded as snake-oil salesmen . . . I believe that voters were right to admire Jeremy Corbyn back then”.

Oborne expressed later disappointment: “He’s sat on the fence for so long that the iron has entered his soul, as early 20th-century PM David Lloyd George once said of an opponent. . . Rather than being too Left-wing, I’m convinced Corbyn is not radical enough. Very occasionally we get a reminder of his old passionate commitment to Left-wing politics”:

  • He has been outspoken in his opposition to U.S. warmongering in the Persian Gulf against Iran
  • He is the only frontline British politician to condemn India’s illegal clampdown in Kashmir

Has Corbyn been “spineless and far too willing to change his mind?”

Oborne notes that in 2013 Corbyn (right) was one of a dozen Labour MPs who voted in the Commons against spending seed money on HS2 high-speed rail project. But then he changed his mind and voted for its construction. The following year, Labour’s election manifesto supported the new link.

Less cogent is his criticism of Corbyn because in the 1975 referendum, he voted for Britain to leave the EU’s predecessor, the Common Market and in the 2016 referendum, he changed his mind and campaigned for the UK to stay. The writer believes that this is a perfectly reasonable attitude, shared by many, because:

  • the EU has seen peace between its member states, despite their history,
  • poorer regions have received funding,
  • many of the EU’s environmental policies have been beneficial
  • and the economies of member states have become so closely interwoven that a break would cause serious and prolonged disruption to the British economy.

Oborne continues: “But U-turn Jeremy then supported a Commons amendment in January demanding that we stay in the EU for longer and then called for a permanent customs union and close alignment to the single market . . . and now his Labour party wants a second referendum”

Towards the end he writes: “Next month will mark (Corbyn’s) fourth year in the job and it looks more and more as if he has flunked that chance. His influence is waning by the day. On October 31, with Brexit, this country faces one of the most important peacetime decisions for generations. It will be the last proper chance for Corbyn to show leadership”.

 

 

 

 

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Jeremy Corbyn’s pledge to “drive big money out of democracy”

 

In Bolton on Sunday (18.8.19) Mr Corbyn announced a new policy to ban donations or loans to parties from non-doms and those not registered for tax in Britain. He said:

“People are right to feel that politics doesn’t work for them. It doesn’t. Boris Johnson and the Conservative Party are captured by big donors, who are corrupting democracy. If you have the money you can get access to ministers. Look at the fracking industry. But if you wish to protest against the frackers because it will damage the environment, you can’t get a hearing”.

Lamiat Sabin (right) reports that Cabinet Office shadow minister Jon Trickett is working on a comprehensive plan to stop big money “buying up our democracy” before outlining further plans in the autumn and that Mr Corbyn revealed details of donations to PM Boris Johnson – nearly a million pounds – from hedge funds and bankers.

In all: £953,056.47 came from hedge funds and bankers in donations and income over the last 15 years, (Labour’s analysis of Electoral Commission data and register of members’ interests entries) and contributions of up £730,000 to him or Conservative Associations in his Henley and Uxbridge seats. Some detail:

  • speeches to banks in Europe and the US: £233,056;
  • £100,000 received in June from Ipex Capital chairman Jonathan Moynihan, who also chaired the Vote Leave finance committee;
  • £10,000 in June from hedge fund manager Robin Crispin Odey, who is short-selling the sterling in expectation of a slide in the value of the pound in the event of Mr Johnson’s no-deal Brexit — according to Labour;
  • Johnson flown to New York and paid £94,507.85 for a two-hour speech at the multibillion-dollar hedge fund company Golden Tree Asset Management and
  • £88,000 from hedge fund boss Johan Christofferson from direct donations or contributions to Uxbridge Conservative Association.

He said: “We have to stop the influx of big money into politics. Politics should work for the millions, not the millionaires. Labour is the party of the many, not the few and we do things very differently. We are funded by workers through their trade unions and small donations, averaging just £22 in the last general election. That’s why we will be able to drive big money out of our democracy.”

 

 

 

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Video – Labour can beat Boris Johnson in a general election: Owen Jones today


Owen Jones

Published on 9 Aug 2019

I’m just going put it out there and say that an election is coming and Boris Johnson is eminently beatable. But only if the left are more radical. They must fiercely oppose Johnson’s values, offer a clear and coherent position on Brexit and play to Jeremy Corbyn’s key strengths as a campaigner. But what do you think? Is it all over for Labour? Or will the Tories fall apart in an election campaign?

See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JrW34mDtKN4

 

 

 

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Corbyn is a lifelong opponent of racism of all kinds

Stroud News and Journal, 31 July 2019, p. 37  [also in the Glos Gazette and Glos and Wilts Standard, 1 August) 

I read Royston Gay’s letter “Labour’s anti-Semitism shames us all” with the deepest dismay. As a Labour Party member of Jewish descent, I simply do not recognise the Labour Party he writes of.

The notorious Panorama programme he speaks of was a prime example of a tabloid hatchet job, which falls apart with any serious analysis. Apart from the fact it was concocted by a Murdoch acolyte, who paraded a succession of victims who nearly all belong to organisations with an axe to grind, where was the right of reply and counter-argument?

Let’s give the anti-Semitism issue a little context. Cases of anti-Semitism involving Labour Party members amount to less than .01% of the membership. While many hundreds of incidents have to be dealt with, and I hope each and every one receives the severest sanction, the number of members involved is still relatively small. Any is too many, but this needs to be been in perspective.

 

There is less anti-Semitism in Labour than in society in general, and certainly less anti-Semitism and other forms of racism than in the Conservative Party.

 

So why is it that all the media’s focus remains on the Labour Party? The elephant in the room is that anything that can be used to undermine Labour under its present leadership is regarded as fair game. Attacking Corbyn on this issue is absurd; he is a lifelong opponent of racism of all kinds.

 

Paul Halas

Stroud

 

 

 

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‘Staunch support for Jeremy Corbyn from the excellent Bruce Kent’: Richard House

 

 

 

Richard House sends a photograph from the London Standard and comments – ‘not often Jeremy gets a fair press in the Tory Standard’

 

 

 

 

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A wager: the polls, for what they’re worth, will swing back towards Labour before too long

I’ve read three forecasts, two written by readers and Mervyn Hyde’s letter in the Western Daily Press (29 July 2019, p.18), forwarded by Richard House. I’ll summarise the latter because it presents the scenario which fits in with the mindset of this website. The others may be seen on this website.

Of course the sceptics will call it wishful thinking – I may even get another message like the one received last week which just said:

NO

Mervyn made these points:       

While Brexit continues to dominate the political world, both Conservatives and Labour are bound to be unpopular.

With the levels of bias towards the political right in the mainstream media, Labour’s “existential crisis” was always going to get far more unfavourable media coverage than that of the Tories.

Once Brexit is resolved and starts receding into the background, the issues that really matter to people will come to the foreground again – like the NHS, our schools, climate change, child poverty, housing, social care, crime, tax avoidance and so on.

The Tories have an appalling record on all of them – and soon they won’t have a gargantuan Brexit fig-leaf to hide behind.

Forecast

It goes without saying that the right-wing media will continue to demonise Jeremy Corbyn in every way they can; but time is also running out for the Tories – their majority propped up by the Irish DUP is now so small, the inevitable will come sooner rather than later.

With new PM, Mr Johnson, having just appointed the most right-wing cabinet in living memory and with the impact this will have on these core issues, I’ll wager the sum of my pension on the polls, for what they’re worth, swinging back towards Labour before too long.

 

 

 

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ISF to consider global economic policies to address climate change

Labour has convened an International Social Forum, bringing together politicians, economists and social movement leaders from across the world. It will launch a new dialogue on the reform of the international institutional architecture needed to tackle the global challenges of the twenty first century.

Its first meeting on Sunday began the construction of a programme to reform our global economic policymaking architecture in order to address climate change.

Currently, only greenhouse gases generated by goods and services produced within the country are measured”

Lamiat Sabin, journalist and parliamentary reporter, informs us that Jeremy Corbyn intends to disclose for the first time the “true impact” on the climate of Britain’s emissions:

Though these levels have reduced, Ms Sabin points out that statisticians are not adding on the emissions generated from imported goods — which the Labour leader says have “barely changed” in 20 years.

Jeremy Corbyn: Britain is effectively “offshoring” its emissions to the rest of the world:

“It’s time we were honest about our contribution to the climate crisis. It is even greater than we think. So under Labour, Britain will become the first major economy in the world to measure these consumption emissions and take action to reduce them.”

Labour is seeking to amend the Climate Change Act

An instruction to the Committee on Climate Change should include an assessment of Britain’s “total footprint emissions” in its annual report to Parliament, with recommendations to reduce them.

Offshoring our emissions isn’t just bad for the climate, it’s bad for British industry”

Mr Corbyn explained that when we measure the emissions from goods produced in Britain but not those produced overseas, it puts industry here, especially energy-intensive industries like steel, at a disadvantage.

He vowed to invest billions of pounds in his party’s plan for a green industrial revolution, which Labour hopes will help close the north-south divide by basing a vast majority of up to 400,000 new jobs in the north of England.

Mr Corbyn sees the urgent need to tackle global emissions, instead of merely ‘passing the buck’ to countries with the highest greenhouse gas emissions who produce our goods and services, adding:

“We will send financial and technical support to the developing world, helping them to adopt greener methods of production and reducing the carbon content of the goods we import.”

Note: The National Policy Forum is a body of representatives from all the major groups in the Labour Party. Its role is to shape the Labour Party’s policy agenda. NPF Representatives read and discuss submissions received via the Labour Policy Forum website, and discuss them in the relevant Policy Commissions. Go to this site to offer your policy proposals to your regional representative.

 

 

 

 

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